USP Drugs: Text Format

USP Drugs:
Text Format: J

To add these medical pharmaceutical spellings to your spell checker:

First, a word about the spelling of generic, non-prescription, prescription, and OTC (over-the-counter) pharmaceuticals. As a general rule, the chemical name of a drug, usually called the "generic name," is not capitalized, while the proper or trade name is. There are some exceptions however, such as when drug companies take a generic drug name and preface it with certain letters. A good example of this spelling protocol is "Apo-Furosemide," which is the brand, trade, or proper name of the generic drug "furosemide" made by Apotex Inc. Because the generic name becomes part of a proper name, it should be capitalized. Secondly, when adding prescription and nonprescription drug and product names to your speller program, be careful what you add. Nowadays many companies spell the actual drug or product just a little bit different than the actual generic name. If you add a slightly altered drug word, such as "Oxybutyn" (the brand, trade, or proper name) for "oxybutynin" (the generic name), your speller will accept the proper name when you may have actually intended to type the generic version. You will also come across similar decisions when adding products whose proper names may have manufactured words such as "Sunfilter" in "Bain de Soleil All Day Sunfilter."

With your word-processing program or a text editor open, use your mouse to select all the words below in one group. Then, while the words are still selected, copy the words by keying <CTRL>+<C>. This copies the selected text to your computer's "clipboard." Go to a new page in your word-processing program or text editor and key <CTRL><V>. This "pastes" the words onto the page from your computer's "clipboard." Now run your spell-checking feature as you normally would and just add any words your spell checker program does not recognize, keeping in mind the cautions outlined above. The drug and product words and word-groups listed below are separated by a comma.


JE-Vax, Jectofer, Jenamicin, Jenest, Jenest-28, Jevity, Jevity Plus, Johnson's Baby Sunblock, Johnson's Baby Sunblock Extra Protection, Johnson's No More Tears Baby Sunblock, Jopanonsyre, Junior Strength Caplets, Junior Strength Caplets Motrin, Just Tears,


0-9 ~ Aa-Am ~ An-Az ~ B ~ Ca-Ch ~ Ci-Cy ~ D ~ E ~ F ~ G ~ H ~ I ~ J ~ K ~ L ~ M ~ N ~ O ~ Pa-Pk ~ Pl-Pz ~ Q ~ R ~ S ~ Ta-Th ~ Ti-To ~ Tr-Ty ~ U ~ V ~ W ~ X ~ Y ~ Z

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Very Important:
Please use the above information at your own risk. While we make every effort to ensure accuracy, we cannot be held responsible for errors in spelling or capitalization, or any circumstance that may result because of said error. When using any reference material you find on Medword's site you always agree to never hold Medword Medical Sales responsible for any errors should they exist.

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